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Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, MBA, PhD: Data Science to Promote Precision Medicine for All

 

 

 

 

 

Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, MBA, PhD
Waldemar von Zedtwitz Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics and Data Science
Deputy Dean for Biomedical Informatics, Yale School of Medicine
Chair, Section of Biomedical Informatics and Data Science

Abstract

Dr. Ohno-Machado will discuss the potential consequences of the increased use of predictive models in healthcare. With the increased sharing of clinical data, many issues related to privacy, validation, and representativeness of AI models have surfaced and must be addressed. Biomedical informatics and data science have a major role in ensuring that models first, do no harm and second, provide measurable benefits to individuals, groups, and society in general.

Short Bio

Lucila Ohno-Machado, MD, PhD, MBA, Waldemar von Zedwitz Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics and Data Science, is deputy dean for biomedical informatics and chair of the newly created free-standing Section for Biomedical Informatics and Data Science (BIDS) at Yale School of Medicine. As deputy dean for biomedical informatics, Ohno-Machado oversees the infrastructure related to biomedical informatics research across the Yale academic health system. BIDS addresses inequality in health care and research with innovative approaches at the intersection of engineering, technology, and medicine. Its faculty work with scientists exploring fundamental biological principles and physician-scientists implementing interventions that promote health for all. It also leads new studies and data collection initiatives; builds new algorithms and tools; and is the nexus of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine at Yale. Prior to the current position, Ohno-Machado was associate dean and chair of the department of biomedical informatics at the University of California San Diego. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the American College of Medical Informatics, and the International Academy of Health Sciences Informatics.

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